The Production Blog provides updates and information on the behind-the-scenes activity of the production, design and development teams working on the ISDC concept. 

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How many people will Endeavour need to make it into deep space? That’s a question several teams have been working on recently, for a number of reasons.

It’s a question of crucial concern to the vessel design team, who need to balance the number of people necessary to operate the ship’s systems with the amount of living space needed to ensure safety and comfort on long cruises. Endeavour’s systems will be complex but many functions can be managed by artificial intelligence built into the command and control systems, reducing the number of crew needed.

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Tactical teams have shared their thoughts on what might happen if Endeavour goes to battlestations. As these systems roll out, we're getting a better idea what combat in space will look like.

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With Endeavour's first systems rolling out of the workshop, a crew will soon be needed to operate them them and take Endeavour out into deep space. Check out your options for joining them.

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So you're a multi-national ultra-top-secret organisation and want to build a starship in orbit using alien technology. How could you possibly hope to keep such an undertaking secret from spy agencies, the media and every backyard astronomer whose telescope strays in your general direction? You're not quite in plain sight but may as well be.

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At the core of Endeavour will be her power generation systems, from which every other system on the ship will run. The majority of power will be generated by a fusion reactor. This isn’t currently a viable technology on Earth, but with a little help from captured alien technology the ISDC has cracked the secret to sustainable fusion power generation.

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The ISDC’s interstellar vessel has a name chosen from history: Endeavour.

Referred to as “the vessel’ until now, Endeavour has been named after the vessel Captain Cook sailed on his world-changing voyage of exploration in 1768. Pictured is a replica of Endeavour based at the Maritime Museum in Sydney, Australia.

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The naval architecture team have begun exploring designs for the exterior of the ISDC’s interstellar vessel, with a couple of rounds of design concepts already completed.

The team is guided by the ISDC’s vessel design principles which outline factors such as how long the vessel should be expected to stay in deep space, what she could expect to have to defend herself against and the conditions that her crew should expect aboard.

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At the core of the immersive sci-fi concept is the simulator engine, which allows every system on the vessel to be modelled and operated as if it was real.

The simulator engine models each system’s behaviour as mathematical algorithms. This ensures the system behaves consistently in response to input from the crew or environment, but still leaves plenty of scope for realistic system behaviour like the need for system maintenance to avoid random component failures.

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The ISDC’s third generation of websites are about to be launched.

The new site design recognises the complexities of presenting the dual aspects of immersive sci-fi. The first aspect is a highly-realistic simulated environment where everything is presented as real, while the second aspect is an online TV show. Each aspect now has its own look and feel.

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